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Travel Tips

Getting to San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua, from Costa Rica.

San Juan Del Sur is a charming town along the beach with lots of fun things to do (bars, clubs, restaurants) and great surfing, snorkeling, diving, jungle treks.

While we came to Costa Rican W. Coast for an amazing kiteboarding trip with friends. We were supposed to meet in a few days, so we decided to check out Nicaragua and visit the awesome nomad.life house.

We made the mistake of renting a car at LIR (Liberia Airport) and trying to drive over the border. We were stopped at the border and had to turn back because the vehicle required special permission from the government to leave Costa Rica and enter Nicaragua. This is a common problem, but here’s how we overcame it:

  • After being turned around in the evening, we drove to Blue Dream Hotel (4o mins from the border) to spend the night.

We looked up our options and decided to do the following:

  1. From Blue Dream Hotel Rt. 935 to La Cruz (20 mins)
  2. Then go left on the biggest main road, Rt. 1 North. Drive 20 minutes from La Cruz to Beña Blanca (border crossing),you may just drive around stopped trucks. There are a lot of them.
  3. At the border there will be many locals trying to “help” you, and enable you to exchange to Nicaraguan Currency. You need USD to enter the border, not NIO (They’re trying to make a quick buck and rip you off, but they’re sort of helpful).
  4. When you get to the border, you’ll have to pay a $8/person exit tax to Costa Rica at the “Post Office” (just a window on the side of the road. If you can skip this, do… This seemed to us like a scam, but technically that’s what you’re supposed to do.) They take USD or CRC (Costa Rican Colones).
  5. Then you drive to the border crossing, and get your passport stamped. (You’re getting stamped out of Costa Rica).
  6. Get back in the car, drive 800 feet to an area with a number of cars parked to your right and trucks/buses passing through. (Our rental car was required to have a specified permit to pass, we didn’t have it, as rentals generally aren’t allowed to cross.) So we parked here (just before the police booth).
  7. Here we took our bags from the car and walked another 500 feet, along the way we had our passports examined for the CR exit and were permitted to continue.
  8. Keep walking past a fence some military personnel. You will see buses pulled over here. This is now the entrance to Nica.
  9. Pay $2/ person at the window when you enter the building (slightly to your left).
  10. Then walk up to passport control and get stamped to enter Nica. (It’s a 90 day visa). They charged us another $12USD/pp here. I believe you may have to pay as much as $20USD/per person.
  11. Once you’re through, you put your bags through some scanners, like you had to when entering the airport.
  12. Now you’re officially in Nica.
  13. Walk out, and there will be many people hassling you to take a cab. We shared a cab with another couple and ended up spending $25 for the whole thing. Most of the people are asking $30.
  14. Have the cab take you to the beach in San Juan Del Sur. You may also go from here by bus.

Other option (Bus):

  1. If you’re not keen on driving, there’s a bus station in La Cruz.
  2. Online I read that the easiest way to cross by bus is to take the TicaBus or Trans Nica.
  3. The option we had (because of the time we were going) was to take a bus to the border instead of drive. ($2/per person)
  4. Then do 5-12 from above.
  5. Then take a local bus from the Nica border to San Juan. ($1 or 2 /per person)
  6. For us, time was of the essence and we chose the faster (slightly pricier) option.

If you’re here a couple of days, I’ve heard there are some amazing jungle treks and canopy tours within 20-30 minutes of San Juan.

The vibe is a bit young (spring break style in some place: loud music at night. Lots of people drinking a lot and running around the town. Also annoying to see young local kids (5-12 or so lighting fire crackers in many places at night). Not our thing, but we’re still enjoying the town. We’ll be here 2 more days.

Hope that’s helpful! Please don’t hesitate to ask any questions!

We’re loving the town here, lots of nice restaurants and hotels.

 

Things you should definitely bring:

fund your trip, How to:, pro tips, tips

Travel By Numbers

How to: See the World and Make Money While Abroad

Sara Nagie 
September 14th


Your life no longer needs to be a 9 to 5. With today’s technology, it’s not a matter of money but passion. At Unboundly, we believe with a will, there’s a way. We created this article to help you make your way around the world!

All you need to do is, know your resources. Lucky for you, we’re sharing some of our favorites here.

 

Option #1: The Do Nothing and Make Money

You’ve packed your bags, gotten on the plane, what’s left behind? An apartment, a room, a car? Things you won’t be using until you get home. Here’s a trick, rent out what you’re not using. Airbnb is no secret, what about Airbnb for your car?

 

Step 1. Check out Turo or Getaround

Step 2. Create a free listing

Step 3. Describe your car

Step 4. Upload some clean photos

Step 5. Make money!

 

Option #2: Making Dough During Layovers

You’re between destinations with nothing to do. How about make some money? It’s time to ask yourself how you feel about Fidget Spinners. An easy way to make a quick buck is to surf the web, test products and get paid. Thats right, corporate will pay for your opinion!

Step 1. Check out UserTesting

Step 2. Visit a website or app

Step 3. Complete a set of tasks, speaking your thoughts out loud

Step 4. Get paid $10 for each completed job (usually 5-10 mins)

 

Option #3: Skills and Zero Bills

It’s been awhile since you’ve called one place home and you like it that way. You’re a nomad and you like the freedom to do what you love wherever and whenever. Why not have a nomadic career? If you’re in need of small jobs, large jobs or you want a fixed price or hourly terms check out Freelancer or Upwork. Sites like these give you flexible jobs from your laptop anywhere in the world. Make/edit a website, designs, or create content with a killer view!

Here’s How It Works:

Step 1. Create your profile

Step 2. Name your price.

 

Step 3. Meet Clients – Send and Receive Tasks and Files

Step 4. Share Feedback in Real Time

Step 5. Simplified Global Payments (Get Paid anywhere in the world)

Step 6. Earn Money to fund your life

Don’t forget: The cost of living abroad is usually a fraction of what it costs to live in the US!

 

 

 

 

Bottom line here: you’re FREE! You don’t need to be tied to the desk.

 

Your office can be wherever you want it to be. All you need to do is know yourself, your skills and have a map handy!

Option #3: Be an entrepreneur and make money from your travels – take control of your wealth

Step 1. Get a drone and a nice camera. These are both perfect for travel:

Drone: The Mavic is awesome.

Camera: The Cannon Rebel T6 is very powerful, and lightweight

Step 2. Watch a few photography lessons on YouTube to get great footage.

Aerial Photography (Free Lesson)

Still Landscape Phorography (Free Lesson)

Step 3. Travel to beautiful places and shoot

Step 4. Launch a YouTube Channel, get paid for people to watch it and license your photos

 

At Unboundly, we view travel is a powerful medium for experience, learning and connection.

 

Subscribe to learn more about easy, flexible and affordable international travel, we’ve got you covered!

Quick Tip: Understanding how to live the 4 Hour Work Week (Author Credit: Tim Ferris)  – Pick up the book

 

Travel Tips

3 Must Read Books for World Travelers

Vagabonding

by Rolf Potts

This book started a movement. It's a glimpse into how to live life to the fullest, escape your normal lifestyle, and experience the world by getting on the road.

This book started a movement. It’s a glimpse into how to live life to the fullest, escape your normal lifestyle, and experience the world by getting on the road.

Find it on Good Reads

Find it on Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

4 Hour Work Week

by Tim Ferriss

Take charge of your life, free up your time, and do the things you love. Tim Ferriss provides a series of tips and anecdotes to prove to readers that it's possible (and necessary) to escape the 9-5 and live your dream life.

 

Take charge of your life, free up your time, and do the things you love. Tim Ferriss provides a series of tips and anecdotes to prove to readers that it’s possible (and necessary) to escape the 9-5 and live your dream life.

Find it on Good Reads

Find it on Amazon

 

 

 

 

Travel the World for $50 A Day

by Matt Kepnes

Matt Kepnes, better known as "Nomadic Matt" is a seasoned travel professional who is living the dream. He's put together this book of practical tips to enable more people to travel and experience the world. This is a practical guide, with tons of tips to make world travel possible for anyone.

Matt Kepnes, better known as “Nomadic Matt” is a seasoned travel professional who is living the dream. He’s put together this book of practical tips to enable more people to travel and experience the world. This is a practical guide, with tons of tips to make world travel possible for anyone.

Find it on Good Reads

Find it on Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

Travel Tips

Best Camera Bag for Travel

You’ve got a great camera, but which bag suits your needs best?

I spent years looking for the best camera bag for travel, and I finally found it!

For this type of purchase there are likely two style preferences, there are those that like backpacks (for carrying several lenses) and those that prefer shoulder bags (which fit less lenses, but allow easier access to them).  Lowepro offers some of the best bags on the market and they have a model that will suit nearly every photographer’s needs.  There are versions of the bags that even have slots for additional electronics such as a laptop or ipad.

Here are my favorites: 

 – the shoulder bag is extremely versatile, and can be worn on your front when you are wearing a larger pack on your back (in my case while I backpack around the world).  Inside the bag there are compartments for your extra batteries, SIM cards, cords, etc., a larger insert (that can be removed) which holds up to 3 lenses and a camera body, and a compression zipper that allows you to easily transform the bag between the two potential sizes.  Even when the camera carrying insert is inside the bag, you still have plenty of room to fit additional items, and there are three pockets on the exterior of the bag as well, so you can be creative with your organization.

If you are set on getting a backpack instead – I would opt for the backpack above. Again, extreme versatility, just this one has two shoulder straps and is on your back of course…

I’ve had my bag now for years and taken it to a few dozen countries, so I can additionally attest to its durability.  The bag shows almost no wear at all and it has kept my camera safe and secure in even the most unimaginable situations (I do travel to quite a few third world nations and when I am there opt for local transport).

Hope this helps you determine the best camera bag to bring with you on your next excursion, whether it be in a local park or on a journey to the other side of the world!